[identity profile] writingvixen.livejournal.com
sideburgundy_reg


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16TH
8:00 pm EST
http:www.chatzy.com/writingsprints

DO YOU WANT A BINDER THAT WILL HELP YOU ORGANIZE AND GET THROUGH YOUR NANOWRIMO? COME TO OUR BINDER WORKSHOP. YOU ARE GUARANTEED TO WALK AWAY PREPARED, REFRESHED, AND READY TO GO!

WE WILL DO A STEP BY STEP PROCESS AND HAVE A GOOD TIME. QUESTIONS/COMMENTS, LET ME KNOW!

Supply list )
[identity profile] writingvixen.livejournal.com
sideburgundy_reg


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16TH
8:00 pm EST
http:www.chatzy.com/writingsprints

DO YOU WANT A BINDER THAT WILL HELP YOU ORGANIZE AND GET THROUGH YOUR NANOWRIMO? COME TO OUR BINDER WORKSHOP. YOU ARE GUARANTEED TO WALK AWAY PREPARED, REFRESHED, AND READY TO GO!

WE WILL DO A STEP BY STEP PROCESS AND HAVE A GOOD TIME. QUESTIONS/COMMENTS, LET ME KNOW!

Supply list )
sarahcb1208: (girly girl)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208

Today’s Link: http://pbackwriter.blogspot.com/2005/01/ten-things-to-help-with-novel-plotting.html

And, in order to catch us back up to where we wanted to be today, a two-fer!

This is another of those links to multiple links. Each of these links goes to a different “system” for plotting. So if the mindmapping isn’t going your way, try out the snowflake process. Or look at the Plot Outline Diagram. The snowflake process is really great, though I do a lot of it subconsciously, so I don’t have the patience to actually do it all out on paper. But if you can focus on it, it’s a really great system for coming up with something that’s complex enough to fully keep your attention for a month while you’re writing it in November.

From here: http://maidenfine.wordpress.com/2009/10/13/30-days-of-prewriting-day-13/

sarahcb1208: (girly girl)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208

Today’s Link: http://pbackwriter.blogspot.com/2005/01/ten-things-to-help-with-novel-plotting.html

And, in order to catch us back up to where we wanted to be today, a two-fer!

This is another of those links to multiple links. Each of these links goes to a different “system” for plotting. So if the mindmapping isn’t going your way, try out the snowflake process. Or look at the Plot Outline Diagram. The snowflake process is really great, though I do a lot of it subconsciously, so I don’t have the patience to actually do it all out on paper. But if you can focus on it, it’s a really great system for coming up with something that’s complex enough to fully keep your attention for a month while you’re writing it in November.

From here: http://maidenfine.wordpress.com/2009/10/13/30-days-of-prewriting-day-13/

sarahcb1208: (bring it)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208
Are you unsure if Sprinting is for you?
Do you need a refresher on how to sprint?
Well, Saturday, Oct. 13 is the perfect day to get that refresher, or learn for sure.

I'll (Sarah) be hosting "Warm Up Sprints" for a 3-hour block. Every ten minutes, you'll be given a prompt, and you write using that prompt. You don't have to use what's in the prompt exactly, but use it to inspire some creativity and get those muscles moving!

The prompts will be sentences, a single word, a phrase. Who knows?

So, on Oct. 13 (TODAY!!), from 3pm to 6pm Eastern, the chatroom will be open and sprints will be running!
I hope to see you there!!
sarahcb1208: (bring it)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208
Are you unsure if Sprinting is for you?
Do you need a refresher on how to sprint?
Well, Saturday, Oct. 13 is the perfect day to get that refresher, or learn for sure.

I'll (Sarah) be hosting "Warm Up Sprints" for a 3-hour block. Every ten minutes, you'll be given a prompt, and you write using that prompt. You don't have to use what's in the prompt exactly, but use it to inspire some creativity and get those muscles moving!

The prompts will be sentences, a single word, a phrase. Who knows?

So, on Oct. 13 (TODAY!!), from 3pm to 6pm Eastern, the chatroom will be open and sprints will be running!
I hope to see you there!!
[identity profile] writingvixen.livejournal.com
What is your favorite type of sprint? Length - prompt - etc. Let us know in the comments!
[identity profile] writingvixen.livejournal.com
What is your favorite type of sprint? Length - prompt - etc. Let us know in the comments!
sarahcb1208: (Default)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208
Are you unsure if Sprinting is for you?
Do you need a refresher on how to sprint?
Well, Saturday, Oct. 13 is the perfect day to get that refresher, or learn for sure.

I'll (Sarah) be hosting "Warm Up Sprints" for a 3-hour block. Every ten minutes, you'll be given a prompt, and you write using that prompt. You don't have to use what's in the prompt exactly, but use it to inspire some creativity and get those muscles moving!

The prompts will be sentences, a single word, a phrase. Who knows?

So, on Oct. 13 (Saturday!!), from 3pm to 6pm Eastern, the chatroom will be open and sprints will be running!
I hope to see you there!!
sarahcb1208: (Default)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208
Are you unsure if Sprinting is for you?
Do you need a refresher on how to sprint?
Well, Saturday, Oct. 13 is the perfect day to get that refresher, or learn for sure.

I'll (Sarah) be hosting "Warm Up Sprints" for a 3-hour block. Every ten minutes, you'll be given a prompt, and you write using that prompt. You don't have to use what's in the prompt exactly, but use it to inspire some creativity and get those muscles moving!

The prompts will be sentences, a single word, a phrase. Who knows?

So, on Oct. 13 (Saturday!!), from 3pm to 6pm Eastern, the chatroom will be open and sprints will be running!
I hope to see you there!!
sarahcb1208: (Default)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208

Today’s Link: http://kalindria.googlepages.com/

There are multiple things of use at this link, though the one we’re focusing on today is the “Outline 50k 20 Chap.” Anyone who went to the worldbuilding/prewriting presentation that I did at the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library already saw a shorter version of this. I wanted to cut it down to 2 pieces of paper, so I took out a bunch of stuff that wasn’t about the outline or the setting chart. It’s all good stuff though, so be sure to read the whole thing and click on the other links as well. There’s a lot of good stuff.

Up until today, we’ve been working on an outline. And we had a good start going. But not everyone works quite so well in the mindmap program. If your mind works differently, I want to be sure to give you the right option for you. Which is why this outline is great. This outline not only breaks your 50k novel down into 20 chapters, it gives you a little bit of direction regarding what should be in those 20 chapters. And, for those who maybe haven’t done this before, it gives a little bit of guidance to let you know if things are moving too quickly or too slowly, based on word counts.

And, just a little something on the side about journaling. As I mentioned, I had my gall bladder removed this weekend. Which was both sucky (major, major pain sent me to the ER) and also good (I feel really good about not having a gall bladder anymore). But, the way this relates to journaling, is that I will probably not remember half of what happened this weekend in a couple days. I barely remember half of it now, considering I was very tired and well-drugged for a decent amount of time. But, if I make sure to write down what I do remember, I can use it later. Maybe Bob will have a gall bladder episode after eating something particularly spicy on a date with the woman he loves. Or maybe I’ll save it for a different book and a different character. I can use it whenever I want, because it’s all written down. Which, to me, is the main benefit of a journal. It helps to remember more than just what happened, but also how it happened, how it felt when it happened, and what happened around it.

So whether, like me, you got a body part removed this month, or maybe you just decided to do something a little crazy and try to write a 50,000 word novel in November, be sure to get started on a journal. You may want to remember how all this felt later.

From: http://maidenfine.wordpress.com/2009/10/13/30-days-of-prewriting-day-12/

sarahcb1208: (Default)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208

Today’s Link: http://kalindria.googlepages.com/

There are multiple things of use at this link, though the one we’re focusing on today is the “Outline 50k 20 Chap.” Anyone who went to the worldbuilding/prewriting presentation that I did at the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library already saw a shorter version of this. I wanted to cut it down to 2 pieces of paper, so I took out a bunch of stuff that wasn’t about the outline or the setting chart. It’s all good stuff though, so be sure to read the whole thing and click on the other links as well. There’s a lot of good stuff.

Up until today, we’ve been working on an outline. And we had a good start going. But not everyone works quite so well in the mindmap program. If your mind works differently, I want to be sure to give you the right option for you. Which is why this outline is great. This outline not only breaks your 50k novel down into 20 chapters, it gives you a little bit of direction regarding what should be in those 20 chapters. And, for those who maybe haven’t done this before, it gives a little bit of guidance to let you know if things are moving too quickly or too slowly, based on word counts.

And, just a little something on the side about journaling. As I mentioned, I had my gall bladder removed this weekend. Which was both sucky (major, major pain sent me to the ER) and also good (I feel really good about not having a gall bladder anymore). But, the way this relates to journaling, is that I will probably not remember half of what happened this weekend in a couple days. I barely remember half of it now, considering I was very tired and well-drugged for a decent amount of time. But, if I make sure to write down what I do remember, I can use it later. Maybe Bob will have a gall bladder episode after eating something particularly spicy on a date with the woman he loves. Or maybe I’ll save it for a different book and a different character. I can use it whenever I want, because it’s all written down. Which, to me, is the main benefit of a journal. It helps to remember more than just what happened, but also how it happened, how it felt when it happened, and what happened around it.

So whether, like me, you got a body part removed this month, or maybe you just decided to do something a little crazy and try to write a 50,000 word novel in November, be sure to get started on a journal. You may want to remember how all this felt later.

From: http://maidenfine.wordpress.com/2009/10/13/30-days-of-prewriting-day-12/

sarahcb1208: (lj pals)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208

Today’s Link: http://www.stellacameron.com/contrib/plot.html

When you get started reading Stella Cameron’s article about creating a plot, you might think maybe we’ve done some of this before. And we have. The same things go into pretty much every plot and every novel, but they don’t have to be done in the same order. So her order is different from ours.

1. Gathering – We did this. We have the link to the 36 Dramatic Situations. We’ve looked at the 20 Basic Plots. We read every one of the items on the Big List of RPG Plots. We’ve gathered plenty. And if we did any of the brainstorming and clustering and freewriting from the first few days of the month, we gathered even more.

2. Selection – We did this yesterday, at least for our example. Hopefully, you’ve also made your own selection for your NaNovel. The earlier you decide, the more time you have to prewrite and develop a good outline/system to work from.

3. People – We’ve done this. Or at least we know how. I added Rin and a few other random characters (names only, but names are half the battle with a character). So our mind map now looks like this:

ExampleMMPic2 4. Wants – Some of this is also already done. Our beginning scenario spells out the biggest want for our main characters. They want the Big Thing they’ve been put in charge of to succeed. And, since conflict is the name of the noveling game, we’ll say that Evil McEvilpants wants them to fail, because he wants to be in charge of the Big Thing. But we can come up with a few other wants that are more individualized to each of the characters. Maybe we’ll come up with a little something like this:

ExampleMMPic3 5. Motivate – It’s easy to see how closely this resembles Wants, now that we have some on our mind map. Rin is motivated by curiosity, and probably a little bit of a feeling of incompletion. Bob is motivated by love. Joe is motivated by money. And Evil is probably motivated by money as well. Though, maybe he’s not. Evil could really be motivated by anything. Maybe his family is poor and his mother is sick. He wants to run the Big Thing so that he can afford her medications. That’s still a little bit of a money motivation, but it’s also a family loyalty and responsibility motivation. And it’s always nice to give a villain a motivation that makes sense and makes him at least a little bit likeable. One of my favorite authors has made me hate a character in one book, then turn things around in the next book in the series and make me hate that same character. If your villain is just evil for evil’s sake, that’s not even an option. Make him angry, nasty, rude, and mean. But don’t make him Pure Evil.

6. On Location – Our location can be anywhere. But the Big Thing has started to take on a little bit of shape (to me, at least). I’m not going to worry about big ideas. The Big Thing itself will likely be our most common location. So, as long as I at least work out that, I can worry about things like what city it’s in, and what time period, later. So, for our example, the Big Thing is a bar and grill. There’s a great place here in my town called The Blind Tiger. They brew their own beer and root beer and the place has a very old-fashioned, rustic feel. So I’m going to keep that in mind as I flesh out the Big Thing.

Starting tomorrow, we’ll talk about other ways to plot this same thing without using the mind map. Not everyone digs that method, so I want to talk about other paths to the same conclusion: an outline/system to write from.

From: http://maidenfine.wordpress.com/2009/10/11/30-days-of-prewriting-day-11/

sarahcb1208: (lj pals)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208

Today’s Link: http://www.stellacameron.com/contrib/plot.html

When you get started reading Stella Cameron’s article about creating a plot, you might think maybe we’ve done some of this before. And we have. The same things go into pretty much every plot and every novel, but they don’t have to be done in the same order. So her order is different from ours.

1. Gathering – We did this. We have the link to the 36 Dramatic Situations. We’ve looked at the 20 Basic Plots. We read every one of the items on the Big List of RPG Plots. We’ve gathered plenty. And if we did any of the brainstorming and clustering and freewriting from the first few days of the month, we gathered even more.

2. Selection – We did this yesterday, at least for our example. Hopefully, you’ve also made your own selection for your NaNovel. The earlier you decide, the more time you have to prewrite and develop a good outline/system to work from.

3. People – We’ve done this. Or at least we know how. I added Rin and a few other random characters (names only, but names are half the battle with a character). So our mind map now looks like this:

ExampleMMPic2 4. Wants – Some of this is also already done. Our beginning scenario spells out the biggest want for our main characters. They want the Big Thing they’ve been put in charge of to succeed. And, since conflict is the name of the noveling game, we’ll say that Evil McEvilpants wants them to fail, because he wants to be in charge of the Big Thing. But we can come up with a few other wants that are more individualized to each of the characters. Maybe we’ll come up with a little something like this:

ExampleMMPic3 5. Motivate – It’s easy to see how closely this resembles Wants, now that we have some on our mind map. Rin is motivated by curiosity, and probably a little bit of a feeling of incompletion. Bob is motivated by love. Joe is motivated by money. And Evil is probably motivated by money as well. Though, maybe he’s not. Evil could really be motivated by anything. Maybe his family is poor and his mother is sick. He wants to run the Big Thing so that he can afford her medications. That’s still a little bit of a money motivation, but it’s also a family loyalty and responsibility motivation. And it’s always nice to give a villain a motivation that makes sense and makes him at least a little bit likeable. One of my favorite authors has made me hate a character in one book, then turn things around in the next book in the series and make me hate that same character. If your villain is just evil for evil’s sake, that’s not even an option. Make him angry, nasty, rude, and mean. But don’t make him Pure Evil.

6. On Location – Our location can be anywhere. But the Big Thing has started to take on a little bit of shape (to me, at least). I’m not going to worry about big ideas. The Big Thing itself will likely be our most common location. So, as long as I at least work out that, I can worry about things like what city it’s in, and what time period, later. So, for our example, the Big Thing is a bar and grill. There’s a great place here in my town called The Blind Tiger. They brew their own beer and root beer and the place has a very old-fashioned, rustic feel. So I’m going to keep that in mind as I flesh out the Big Thing.

Starting tomorrow, we’ll talk about other ways to plot this same thing without using the mind map. Not everyone digs that method, so I want to talk about other paths to the same conclusion: an outline/system to write from.

From: http://maidenfine.wordpress.com/2009/10/11/30-days-of-prewriting-day-11/

[identity profile] writingvixen.livejournal.com
nowdbanner

details to come. plan on being there for fun, games, and a higher word count than you ever imagined.

(click banner for locale)
[identity profile] writingvixen.livejournal.com
nowdbanner

details to come. plan on being there for fun, games, and a higher word count than you ever imagined.

(click banner for locale)
sarahcb1208: (book chick)
[personal profile] sarahcb1208
Today’s Link: http://www.io.com/~sjohn/plots.htm

Now it’s time to go back to the first few days of our prewriting series. I linked to Simon Haynes’ article about plotting using Freemind. At the time, we were talking about clustering. But it becomes important again, now that we’re talking about plotting. Admittedly, not everyone is going to find that method helpful. I do, but not for every novel. Through the process of my prewriting, I’ve determined that my superhero novel is nowhere near ready for me to write in November. The story is being very uncooperative, so it needs a little more simmering time. Maybe I’ll do it for next year’s NaNo. Instead, I’m going to set a goal of 100k words on my second novel that I’d planned to do this year. I think I can do it easily.

Right now, this is what my mind map looks like for that novel (I blurred it to keep from spoiling it for fans of The Mansion, and to protect myself from idea theft. It’s still readable if you really want to read it.)

At this point, I could call that good and start writing. Or, I can choose to break things down a little more, adding in additional details at each of those steps. For this novel, I happen to have a little bit of an idea of what’s going to happen. It was originally plotted out as the last 3 or so books of a 5 book series. I’m cutting down my focus to three major characters and attempting to get all of the 3 books into one. Which may or may not work out well. We’ll see.But maybe you’re not even that clear on your plot. So, let’s take one of the plots from today’s link and work it out a little.

Good Housekeeping The PCs are placed in charge of a large operation (a trading company, a feudal barony, the CIA) and must, despite lack of experience in such things, make it work and thrive.
Common Twists & Themes: The PCs are brought in because something big is about to happen, and the Old Guard wants a chance to escape. The peasants, neighbors, employees, etcetera resent the PCs, because their method of inheritance looks outwardly bad and everybody loved the old boss.

On our mind map, we’d start out with this:

ExampleMMPic
Basically, I broke the one sentence plot summary into three sentences, setting those as our three beginning nodes. If we already know our characters, we can add those on the right side (I’ll add Rin and a couple other random people in there, just for this example). Then, tomorrow, we’ll use our new link to try to flesh out our basic idea.

From: http://maidenfine.wordpress.com/2009/10/10/30-days-of-prewriting-day-10/

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